There are hundreds, thousands even, of people who involuntarily go missing every single day around the world. Unfortunately many of the families of these missing people never see a trace or a sighting of their loved ones again. One man noticed a disturbing trend and started compiling the information for hundreds of missing people, all of whom disappeared within National Park grounds.

David Paulides has made it his mission to research, compile, and expose the mysteries surrounding the disappearances of some of these people. There are bizarre similarities to many cases of missing persons who disappeared from National or State Parks in North America. The Can-Am Missing project is a group of retired police officers, search and rescue professionals and others.

About Us
CanAm Missing is a group of retired police officers, search and rescue experts (SAR) and other professionals that are dedicated to researching, on scene investigating and generally understanding the issues associated with people who go missing in the wilds of North America. This has typically been a project that is intensely worked by search and rescue teams starting when the victim is reported lost and usually continuing for the following 7-14 days, the case then flounders in a file cabinet. After years of reading thousands of SAR reports, speaking with dozens of victims, we believe the paradigm of this effort needs change.

The Can-Am Missing Project

 

 

  • Dennis Martin, 6 years old
  • Steven Michael Norris, 59 years old
  • Jacob Oliver, 23 years old
  • Jessie Hoover, 54 years old
  • Arvin Nelson, 55 years old
  • Richard Hasbell, 34 years old
  • Randy Morgenson, 64 years old
  • Deorr Kunz Jr., 2 years old
  • Stacy Arras, 14 years old
  • Larry Jeffrey, 6 years old
  • Chet Hanson, 27 years old

All of these people have one thing in common with one another. They all went missing from National Parks in North America and none of them have ever been seen again, no remains recovered. In some cases, clothing, belongings or shoes have been found but no evidence of what happened to the person has ever been uncovered. That is just a small list, a fraction of the data that is out there that the Can-Am Missing 411 project has compiled and investigated.

A simple search on Youtube will show you hundreds of videos and interviews with David Paulides talking about the strange and unusual circumstances that exist when someone disappears from a National Park.

 

That is only one story of hundreds that are included in the big picture that this group has been painting for public awareness. Some of the things that the missing people that are found have in common are:

  • Missing shoes
  • Found hundreds or thousands of yards away from where they were last seen, over steep and rough terrain.
  • No reasonable explanation for how they got so far away from where they went missing.

Why would a person who was lost in the woods take off their shoes and leave them behind? They wouldn’t. Same goes for their clothes, their belongings like tents, backpacks, camera gear, etc. But the strangest ones are the small children. Their parents dress them in bright colors so they can be easily spotted if they get separated on the hike, yet these kids just vanish without a trace. A kid is not going to choose the hardest path when they are lost and alone in the woods, they are more likely to go downhill not up, as would anyone in my mind.

I know that if I were somehow lost on a hiking trail my first thought would NOT be to strip my shoes off, possibly my clothes, fold them neatly on the trail and continue, UPhill and OFF the trail, in the nude/barefoot. So what is happening to these people in our National Parks and why don’t the Park Services want to talk about it?

I can tell you that when we go hiking, my kids are always IN FRONT of my eyes, I bring up the rear while their dad walks in the front, kids in the middle for safety. With the change in seasons approaching and the warm weather coming back, the National Parks are going to be full once again of people out for Spring and Summer recreation. I wonder how many names will be added to the list of the missing by the end of the summer and fall.

 

 

 

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